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Acceptability of a programme for the prevention of post-traumatic stress disorder in midwifery: a qualitative investigation with midwives and midwifery managers following feasibility testing

Slade, P, Sheen, K, Collinge, S, Butters, J and Spiby, H Acceptability of a programme for the prevention of post-traumatic stress disorder in midwifery: a qualitative investigation with midwives and midwifery managers following feasibility testing. Midirs Midwifery Digest. ISSN 0961-5555 (Accepted)

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Abstract

Introduction: Midwives are routinely exposed to events in the workplace that they personally perceive to be traumatic. As a result, a proportion of midwives will experience post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This paper presents midwives’ and midwifery managers’ views on the feasibility and acceptability of POPPY (programme for the prevention of PTSD in midwifery).
Methods: The POPPY programme, which consists of a stepped-care package of educational workshops, peer support and trauma-focussed psychological intervention, was implemented in one UK hospital between October 2016 and September 2017. Interviews and a focus group with midwives (n=11) and a focus group with midwifery managers (n=11) were conducted to identify perspectives regarding the acceptability, feasibility and utility of the programme.
Findings: Midwives and their managers perceived the programme as highly relevant and useful, and strongly supported its implementation. The educational workshops acknowledged the potential for midwives who have experienced trauma to develop an understanding of early responses and self-management. There was a strong endorsement for peer support, but evidence of reluctance to access this resource due to fear of judgment and breaches of confidentiality. Access to trauma-focussed psychological intervention was also strongly supported.
Discussion: The programme was viewed as highly acceptable and feasible by midwives and their managers. Recommendations from managers to facilitate successful implementation were identified. Conclusion: Systems to support the midwifery workforce that incorporate prevention of PTSD and, where necessary, intervention, should be implemented and tested at scale, within a systems-wide approach to enable evaluation of effectiveness.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RT Nursing
Divisions: Psychology (new Sep 2019)
Publisher: Midirs
Date Deposited: 05 Mar 2020 11:54
Last Modified: 05 Mar 2020 11:54
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/12384

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