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Mindfulness of voices, self-compassion, and secure attachment in relation to the experience of hearing voices

Dudley, J, Eames, C, Mulligan, J and Fisher, N (2017) Mindfulness of voices, self-compassion, and secure attachment in relation to the experience of hearing voices. British Journal of Clinical Psychology, 57 (1). pp. 1-17. ISSN 0144-6657

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Abstract

Objectives: Developing compassion towards oneself has been linked to improvement in many areas of psychological well‐being, including psychosis. Furthermore, developing a non‐judgemental, accepting way of relating to voices is associated with lower levels of distress for people who hear voices. These factors have also been associated with secure attachment. This study explores associations between the constructs of mindfulness of voices, self‐compassion, and distress from hearing voices and how secure attachment style related to each of these variables.
Design: Cross‐sectional online.
Method: One hundred and twenty‐eight people (73% female; Mage = 37.5; 87.5% Caucasian) who currently hear voices completed the Self‐Compassion Scale, Southampton Mindfulness of Voices Questionnaire, Relationships Questionnaire, and Hamilton Programme for Schizophrenia Voices Questionnaire.
Results: Results showed that mindfulness of voices mediated the relationship between self‐compassion and severity of voices, and self‐compassion mediated the relationship between mindfulness of voices and severity of voices. Self‐compassion and mindfulness of voices were significantly positively correlated with each other and negatively correlated with distress and severity of voices.
Conclusion: Mindful relation to voices and self‐compassion are associated with reduced distress and severity of voices, which supports the proposed potential benefits of mindful relating to voices and self‐compassion as therapeutic skills for people experiencing distress by voice hearing.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1701 Psychology, 1702 Cognitive Sciences
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Psychology (new Sep 2019)
Publisher: Wiley
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 20 Mar 2020 09:12
Last Modified: 20 Mar 2020 09:15
DOI or Identification number: 10.1111/bjc.12153
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/12554

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