Facial reconstruction

Search LJMU Research Online

Browse Repository | Browse E-Theses

OPTIMISING FACILITY MANAGEMENT (FM) COMMUNICATION IN SWISS HOSPITALS: THE DEVELOPMENT OF A FM COMMUNICATION FRAMEWORK

Honegger, F (2020) OPTIMISING FACILITY MANAGEMENT (FM) COMMUNICATION IN SWISS HOSPITALS: THE DEVELOPMENT OF A FM COMMUNICATION FRAMEWORK. Doctoral thesis, Liverpool John Moores University.

[img]
Preview
Text
2019honeggerphd.pdf.pdf - Published Version

Download (19MB) | Preview
[img] Text
March2020_Honegger_PHD_Permissions.pdf - Supplemental Material
Restricted to Repository staff only

Download (479kB)

Abstract

The thesis combines and contributes literature on healthcare, facility management (FM) com-prising the non-medical processes in hospitals, organisational theory and organisational com-munication in light of FM communication in hospitals. It addresses the research gap of non-existing evidence-based research focusing on FM communication in Swiss hospitals for the benefit of FM executives. This is a gap because well-defined organisational communication is a prerequisite for any organisation to function. Nested within business and management research, a mixed-method case study research de-sign was applied, following a primarily inductive approach led by pragmatism. A series of in-terviews with, and a survey addressed to, FM executives with an analysis of FM meeting minutes established characteristics and challenges of formal and informal communication ac-tivities within the context of hospitals’ FM departments. Results show that traditional channels such as e-mail, phone and scheduled meetings domi-nate. Digitalisation is still in its early stages. Meetings and e-mail communication consume substantial resources while there is a risk that these are not used effectively and efficiently. The majority of hospitals’ FM departments do not have specific and consciously aligned com-munication guidelines available. Meeting minutes revealed that the “FM diversity”, by providing a variety of support processes managed by staff with different professional backgrounds and expert knowledge, is not thoroughly used as an asset to collaboratively achieve tasks together. The research implication is a framework optimising communication procedures in Swiss hos-pitals’ FM departments. The framework supports FM executives to check and if necessary, adjust communication procedures within their respective areas of responsibility. The frame-work consists of 10 key elements supporting effective and efficient FM communication. They are put together in a stand-alone 7-page readily understood document. It includes 27 self-check questions raising FM executives’ awareness regarding these elements as a basis to optimise communication activities in their areas of responsibility. The thesis contributes to op-timising FM communication in Swiss hospitals and to knowledge by taking into account the communication requirements within this particular context. Research limitations include that the implications are subject of the particular context of Swiss hospitals’ FM departments. Further does the framework not provide a specific recipe to ensure effective and efficient FM communication. It raises awareness for FM executives to develop communication procedures tailored to their respective areas of responsibility. Nevertheless, the framework does provide a first step as a basis for future research opportunities considering more detailed the “recipe” aspect desired by FM executives.

Item Type: Thesis (Doctoral)
Uncontrolled Keywords: Healthcare; Management; Communication; Facility Management; Facilities Management
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HF Commerce > HF5001 Business
H Social Sciences > HD Industries. Land use. Labor > HD28 Management. Industrial Management
H Social Sciences > HE Transportation and Communications
Divisions: Civil Engineering & Built Environment
Date Deposited: 02 Apr 2020 08:16
Last Modified: 02 Apr 2020 08:16
DOI or Identification number: 10.24377/LJMU.t.00012611
Supervisors: Tucker, MP
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/12611

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item