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Tropical forager gastrophagy and its implications for extinct hominin diets

Buck, LT, Berbesque, CJ, Wood, BM and Stringer, CB (2015) Tropical forager gastrophagy and its implications for extinct hominin diets. Journal of Archaeological Science: Reports, 5. pp. 672-679. ISSN 2352-409X

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Abstract

Reconstruction of extinct hominin diets is currently a topic of much interest and debate, facilitated by new methods such as the analysis of dental calculus. It has been proposed, based on chemical analyses of calculus, that Neanderthals self-medicated, yet this conclusion has been questioned. Gastrophagy has been suggested as an alternative explanation for the Neanderthal data, based on ethnographic analogies, which show this practice to have been widespread in traditional extant Homo sapiens diets, and nutritional evidence for its benefits at high latitudes. Here we expand the discussion of the potential importance of gastrophagy in human evolution by considering its role for an extant group of tropical foragers, the Hadza of Tanzania, and questioning its role in the diets of extinct tropical hominin species. Gastrophagy is frequently practiced among the Hadza and adult men in particular consume substantial …

Item Type: Article
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GF Human ecology. Anthropogeography
Q Science > QH Natural history
Q Science > QH Natural history > QH301 Biology
Divisions: Biological & Environmental Sciences (new Sep 19)
Publisher: Elsevier
Date Deposited: 08 Apr 2020 12:10
Last Modified: 08 Apr 2020 12:15
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/12688

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