Facial reconstruction

Search LJMU Research Online

Browse Repository | Browse E-Theses

Having the stomach for it: a contribution to Neanderthal diets?

Buck, LT and Stringer, C (2013) Having the stomach for it: a contribution to Neanderthal diets? Quaternary Science Reviews, 96. pp. 161-167. ISSN 0277-3791

[img]
Preview
Text
Buck & Stringer, 2014_Submission.pdf - Accepted Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.

Download (164kB) | Preview

Abstract

Due to the central position of diet in determining ecology and behaviour, much research has been devoted to uncovering Neanderthal subsistence strategies. This has included indirect studies inferring diet from habitat reconstruction, ethnographic analogy, or faunal assemblages, and direct methods, such as dental wear and isotope analyses. Recently, studies of dental calculus have provided another rich source of dietary evidence, with much potential. One of the most interesting results to come out of calculus analyses so far is the suggestion that Neanderthals may have been eating non-nutritionally valuable plants for medicinal reasons. Here we offer an alternative hypothesis for the occurrence of non-food plants in Neanderthal calculus based on the modern human ethnographic literature: the consumption of herbivore stomach contents.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 04 Earth Sciences, 21 History and Archaeology
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GF Human ecology. Anthropogeography
Divisions: Biological & Environmental Sciences (new Sep 19)
Publisher: Elsevier
Date Deposited: 09 Apr 2020 10:37
Last Modified: 09 Apr 2020 10:45
DOI or Identification number: 10.1016/j.quascirev.2013.09.003
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/12696

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item