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Vitamin D and the hepatitis B vaccine response: a prospective cohort study and a randomized, placebo-controlled oral vitamin D3 and simulated sunlight supplementation trial in healthy adults.

Kashi, DS, Oliver, SJ, Wentz, LM, Roberts, R, Carswell, AT, Tang, JCY, Jackson, S, Izard, RM, Allan, D, Rhodes, LE, Fraser, WD, Greeves, JP and Walsh, NP (2020) Vitamin D and the hepatitis B vaccine response: a prospective cohort study and a randomized, placebo-controlled oral vitamin D3 and simulated sunlight supplementation trial in healthy adults. European Journal of Nutrition. ISSN 1436-6207

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To determine serum 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D relationship with hepatitis B vaccination (study 1). Then, to investigate the effects on hepatitis B vaccination of achieving vitamin D sufficiency (serum 25(OH)D ≥ 50 nmol/L) by a unique comparison of simulated sunlight and oral vitamin D3 supplementation in wintertime (study 2). METHODS: Study 1 involved 447 adults. In study 2, 3 days after the initial hepatitis B vaccination, 119 men received either placebo, simulated sunlight (1.3 × standard-erythema dose, 3 × /week for 4 weeks and then 1 × /week for 8 weeks) or oral vitamin D3 (1000 IU/day for 4 weeks and 400 IU/day for 8 weeks). We measured hepatitis B vaccination efficacy as percentage of responders with anti-hepatitis B surface antigen immunoglobulin G ≥ 10 mIU/mL. RESULTS: In study 1, vaccine response was poorer in persons with low vitamin D status (25(OH)D ≤ 40 vs 41-71 nmol/L mean difference [95% confidence interval] - 15% [- 26, - 3%]; 1,25(OH)2D ≤ 120 vs ≥ 157 pmol/L - 12% [- 24%, - 1%]). Vaccine response was also poorer in winter than summer (- 18% [- 31%, - 3%]), when serum 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D were at seasonal nadirs, and 81% of persons had serum 25(OH)D < 50 nmol/L. In study 2, vitamin D supplementation strategies were similarly effective in achieving vitamin D sufficiency from the winter vitamin D nadir in almost all (~ 95%); however, the supplementation beginning 3 days after the initial vaccination did not effect the vaccine response (vitamin D vs placebo 4% [- 21%, 14%]). CONCLUSION: Low vitamin D status at initial vaccination was associated with poorer hepatitis B vaccine response (study 1); however, vitamin D supplementation commencing 3 days after vaccination (study 2) did not influence the vaccination response. CLINICAL TRIAL REGISTRY NUMBER: Study 1 NCT02416895; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/study/NCT02416895; Study 2 NCT03132103; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03132103.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
Divisions: Sports & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: Springer
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 15 May 2020 12:11
Last Modified: 15 May 2020 12:15
DOI or Identification number: 10.1007/s00394-020-02261-w
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/12945

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