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Postexercise hypotension and related hemodynamic responses to cycling under heat stress in untrained men with elevated blood pressure.

Cunha, FA, Farinatti, P, Jones, H and Midgley, AW (2020) Postexercise hypotension and related hemodynamic responses to cycling under heat stress in untrained men with elevated blood pressure. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 120 (5). pp. 1001-1013. ISSN 1439-6327

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Abstract

PURPOSE: To investigate the effect of heat stress on postexercise hypotension. METHODS: Seven untrained men, aged 21-33 years, performed two cycling bouts at 60% of oxygen uptake reserve expending 300 kcal in environmental temperatures of 21 °C (TEMP) and 35 °C (HOT) in a randomized, counter-balanced order. Physiological responses were monitored for 10-min before and 60-min after each exercise bout, and after a non-exercise control session (CON). Blood pressure (BP) also was measured during the subsequent 21-h recovery period. RESULTS: Compared to CON, systolic, and diastolic BPs were significantly reduced in HOT (Δ = - 8.3 ± 1.6 and - 9.7 ± 1.4 mmHg, P < 0.01) and TEMP (Δ = - 4.9 ± 2.1 and - 4.5 ± 0.9 mmHg, P < 0.05) during the first 60 min of postexercise recovery. Compared to TEMP, rectal temperature was 0.6 °C higher (P = 0.001), mean skin temperature was 1.8 °C higher (P = 0.013), and plasma volume (PV) was 2.6 percentage points lower (P = 0.005) in HOT. During the subsequent 21-h recovery period systolic BP was 4.2 mmHg lower in HOT compared to CON (P = 0.016) and 2.5 mmHg lower in HOT compared to TEMP (P = 0.039). CONCLUSION: Exercise in the heat increases the hypotensive effects of exercise for at least 22 h in untrained men with elevated blood pressure. Our findings indicate that augmented core and skin temperatures and decreased PV are the main hemodynamic mechanisms underlying a reduction in BP after exercise performed under heat stress.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1106 Human Movement and Sports Sciences
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Sports & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: Springer Verlag
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 29 May 2020 12:15
Last Modified: 29 May 2020 12:15
DOI or Identification number: 10.1007/s00421-020-04340-6
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/13024

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