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Cognitive-Behavioural Intervention for Test Anxiety in Adolescent Students: Do Benefits Extend to School-Related Wellbeing and Clinical Anxiety

Putwain, DW and von der Embse, N Cognitive-Behavioural Intervention for Test Anxiety in Adolescent Students: Do Benefits Extend to School-Related Wellbeing and Clinical Anxiety. Anxiety, Stress and Coping. ISSN 1061-5806 (Accepted)

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Abstract

Cognitive-behavioural interventions have been shown to be effective treatments for test anxiety. Studies on school-aged populations, however, are lacking. In the present study we evaluated a six-session cognitive-behavioural intervention for test anxiety in a sample of secondary school students aged 14-16 years preparing for high-stakes examinations. Furthermore, we extended outcomes to include school-related wellbeing and clinical anxiety. A screening procedure was used to identify highly test anxious persons who were randomly allocated to intervention or wait-list control groups. Test anxiety showed a large reduction following intervention compared to control group participants who showed a moderate reduction. Clinical anxiety showed a small to moderate reduction following intervention compared to control group participants who showed a negligible reduction. The reduction in clinical anxiety was mediated by concurrent reductions in test anxiety. This supports an integrative network approach that deactivating core aspects of anxiety can deactivate associated networks of anxiety symptoms. The intervention showed no impact on school-related wellbeing which increased at a similar rate for both intervention and control group participants. This is likely because test anxiety is just one contributor of many to school-related wellbeing. Implications for school-based treatments are discussed.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1503 Business and Management, 1701 Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
L Education > L Education (General)
Divisions: Education
Publisher: Taylor & Francis (Routledge)
Date Deposited: 10 Jul 2020 10:28
Last Modified: 10 Jul 2020 10:28
URI: https://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/13281

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