Facial reconstruction

Search LJMU Research Online

Browse Repository | Browse E-Theses

Progressive resistance training for adolescents with cerebral palsy: the STAR randomized controlled trial.

Ryan, JM, Lavelle, G, Theis, N, Noorkoiv, M, Kilbride, C, Korff, T, Baltzopoulos, V, Shortland, A, Levin, W and Star Trial Team, (2020) Progressive resistance training for adolescents with cerebral palsy: the STAR randomized controlled trial. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology. ISSN 1469-8749

[img]
Preview
Text
Progressive resistance training for adolescents with cerebral palsy the STAR randomized controlled trial.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution.

Download (152kB) | Preview

Abstract

AIM: To evaluate the effect of progressive resistance training of the ankle plantarflexors on gait efficiency, activity, and participation in adolescents with cerebral palsy (CP). METHOD: Sixty-four adolescents (10-19y; 27 females, 37 males; Gross Motor Function Classification System [GMFCS] levels I-III) were randomized to 30 sessions of resistance training (10 supervised and 20 unsupervised home sessions) over 10 weeks or usual care. The primary outcome was gait efficiency indicated by net nondimensional oxygen cost (NNcost). Secondary outcomes included physical activity, gross motor function, participation, muscle strength, muscle and tendon size, and muscle and tendon stiffness. Analysis was intention-to-treat. RESULTS: Median attendance at the 10 supervised sessions was 80% (range 40-100%). There was no between-group difference in NNcost at 10 (mean difference: 0.02, 95% confidence interval [CI] -0.07 to 0.11, p=0.696) or 22 weeks (mean difference: -0.08, 95% CI -0.18 to 0.03, p=0.158). There was also no evidence of between-group differences in secondary outcomes at 10 or 22 weeks. There were 123 adverse events reported by 27 participants in the resistance training group. INTERPRETATION: We found that 10 supervised sessions and 20 home sessions of progressive resistance training of the ankle plantarflexors did not improve gait efficiency, muscle strength, activity, participation, or any biomechanical outcome among adolescents with CP.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 11 Medical and Health Sciences
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Sports & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: Wiley
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 21 Aug 2020 10:57
Last Modified: 21 Aug 2020 11:00
DOI or Identification number: 10.1111/dmcn.14601
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/13528

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item