Facial reconstruction

Search LJMU Research Online

Browse Repository | Browse E-Theses

Direct access lifestyle training improves liver biochemistry and causes weight loss but uptake is suboptimal in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

Patanwala, I, Molnar, L, Akerboom, K and Lane, KE Direct access lifestyle training improves liver biochemistry and causes weight loss but uptake is suboptimal in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Frontline Gastroenterology. ISSN 2041-4137 (Accepted)

[img] Text
Direct access lifestyle training improves liver biochemistry and causes weight loss but uptake is suboptimal in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease..pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial.

Download (527kB)

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the uptake and effectiveness of an existing open access lifestyle intervention forged in collaboration between a third sector organisation, funded by local government and a secondary care non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) service in the North West of England. Method: A service outcome evaluation using pre-post comparison design was conducted to analyse changes between baseline clinical health records and 12 week follow up for NAFLD patients who completed the lifestyle intervention. Lifestyle factors, weight loss, changes in alanine aminotransferase (ALT) enzymes and lipid profiles were compared between patients who completed the programme versus 1:1 matched patients who did not. Results: Only 16 of 167 NAFLD patients offered the intervention completed the programme. Intervention patients achieved significant weight loss (-2.3% p ≤ 0.05) over 12 weeks, where the non-intervention group had non-significant weight gain (+0.95%). ALT improved by 20IU/L in the interventional group and 15 IU/L in the non-intervention group; however, this was not statistically different. Conclusion: This study presents first of its kind evaluation of a service collaboration in the UK. Only 1 in 10 patients offered the opportunity completed the programme, a limitation that could affect future strategies. Patient and public involvement research is needed to identify barriers to participation, address adherence issues and identify support mechanisms for lifestyle interventions with NAFLD patients.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease; lifestyle intervention; weight loss; alanine aminotransferase enzyme; lipid profiles; service evaluation
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
Date Deposited: 06 Nov 2020 13:45
Last Modified: 06 Nov 2020 13:45
URI: https://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/13970

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item