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Short-term, but not acute, intake of New Zealand blackcurrant extract improves insulin sensitivity and free-living postprandial glucose excursions in individuals with overweight or obesity

Nolan, A, Brett, R, Strauss, JA, Stewart, CE and Shepherd, SO (2020) Short-term, but not acute, intake of New Zealand blackcurrant extract improves insulin sensitivity and free-living postprandial glucose excursions in individuals with overweight or obesity. European Journal of Nutrition. ISSN 1436-6207

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Abstract

Abstract: Impaired postprandial glucose handling and low-grade systemic inflammation are risk factors for developing insulin resistance in individuals with overweight or obesity. Acute ingestion of anthocyanins improves postprandial glucose responses to a single carbohydrate-rich meal under strictly controlled conditions.
Purpose: Examine whether acute and short-term supplementation with anthocyanin-rich New Zealand blackcurrant (NZBC) extract can improve postprandial glucose responses to mixed-macronutrient meals.
Methods: Twenty-five overweight (BMI > 25 kg m2) sedentary individuals participated in one of the following double-blinded, randomised controlled trials: (1) ingestion of 600 mg NZBC extract or placebo prior to consumption of a high-carbohydrate, high-fat liquid meal (n = 12); (2) 8-days supplementation with NZBC extract (600 mg day−1) or placebo, with insulin sensitivity and markers of inflammation assessed on day-7, and free-living postprandial glucose (continuous glucose monitoring) assessed on day-8 (n = 13).
Results: A single dose of NZBC extract had no effect on 3 h postprandial glucose, insulin or triglyceride responses. However, in response to short-term NZBC extract supplementation insulin sensitivity was improved (+ 22%; P = 0.011), circulating C-reactive protein concentrations decreased (P = 0.008), and free-living postprandial glucose responses to both breakfast and lunch meals were reduced (− 9% and − 8%, respectively; P < 0.05), compared to placebo.
Conclusion: These novel results indicate that repeated intake, rather than a single dose of NZBC extract, is required to induce beneficial effects on insulin sensitivity and postprandial glucose handling in individuals with overweight or obesity. Continuous glucose monitoring enabled an effect of NZBC extract to be observed under free-living conditions and highlights the potential of anthocyanin-rich supplements as a viable strategy to reduce insulin resistance.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1111 Nutrition and Dietetics
Subjects: T Technology > TX Home economics > TX341 Nutrition. Foods and food supply
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: Springer
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 20 Nov 2020 11:20
Last Modified: 20 Nov 2020 11:30
DOI or Identification number: 10.1007/s00394-020-02329-7
URI: https://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/14052

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