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Eliciting human intelligence: police source handlers' perceptions and experiences of rapport during covert human intelligence sources (CHIS) interactions

Nunan, J, Stanier, I, Milne, R, Shawyer, A and Walsh, D (2020) Eliciting human intelligence: police source handlers' perceptions and experiences of rapport during covert human intelligence sources (CHIS) interactions. Psychiatry, Psychology and Law. ISSN 1321-8719

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Abstract

Rapport is an integral part of interviewing, viewed as fundamental to the success of intelligence elicitation. One collection capability is human intelligence (HUMINT), the discipline charged with eliciting intelligence through interactions with human sources, such as covert human intelligence sources (CHIS). To date, research has yet to explore the perceptions and experiences of intelligence operatives responsible for gathering HUMINT within England and Wales. The present study consisted of structured interviews with police source handlers (N = 24). Rapport was perceived as essential, especially for maximising the opportunity for intelligence elicitation. Participants provided a range of rapport strategies while highlighting the importance of establishing, and maintaining, rapport. The majority of participants believed rapport could be trained to some degree. Thus, rapport was not viewed exclusively as a natural skill. However, participants commonly perceived some natural attributes are required to build rapport that can be refined and developed through training and experience.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1701 Psychology, 1702 Cognitive Sciences, 1801 Law
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
H Social Sciences > HV Social pathology. Social and public welfare. Criminology > HV7231 Criminal Justice Administrations
Divisions: Justice Studies (new Sep 19)
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 06 Jan 2021 13:34
Last Modified: 06 Jan 2021 13:45
DOI or Identification number: 10.1080/13218719.2020.1734978
URI: https://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/14222

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