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Single infection with Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis or Ranavirus does not increase probability of co-infection in a montane community of amphibians.

Bosch, J, Monsalve-Carcaño, C, Price, SJ and Bielby, J (2020) Single infection with Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis or Ranavirus does not increase probability of co-infection in a montane community of amphibians. Scientific Reports, 10 (1). ISSN 2045-2322

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Abstract

Understanding the occurrence and consequence of co-infections can be useful in designing disease management interventions. Amphibians are the most highly threatened vertebrates, and emerging pathogens are a serious threat to their conservation. The amphibian chytrid fungus and the viruses of the Ranavirus genus are already widely distributed, causing disease outbreaks and population declines worldwide. However, we lack information about the occurrence and consequences of coinfection with these pathogens across age-classes of amphibian hosts. Here, we analyze the occurrence of infection of the amphibian chytrid fungus and ranaviruses during one season in two susceptible amphibian species at two different locations at which outbreaks have occurred. We found that the co-occurrence of both pathogens in a particular host is not common except in highly susceptible life-stages, and that single infections are the most common situation. Moreover, we found that the occurrence of one pathogen in a particular host did not predict the occurrence of the other. We attribute these results to the niches in which both pathogens proliferate in amphibian hosts.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: Q Science > QH Natural history
Q Science > QL Zoology
Divisions: Biological & Environmental Sciences (new Sep 19)
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 26 Jan 2021 12:25
Last Modified: 26 Jan 2021 12:25
DOI or Identification number: 10.1038/s41598-020-78196-3
URI: https://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/14326

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