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Mandibular shape prediction using cephalometric analysis: applications in craniofacial analysis, forensic anthropology and archaeological reconstruction.

Omran, A, Wertheim, D, Smith, K, Liu, CYJ and Naini, FB (2020) Mandibular shape prediction using cephalometric analysis: applications in craniofacial analysis, forensic anthropology and archaeological reconstruction. Maxillofac Plast Reconstr Surg, 42 (1). ISSN 2288-8101

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: The human mandible is variable in shape, size and position and any deviation from normal can affect the facial appearance and dental occlusion. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to determine whether the Sassouni cephalometric analysis could help predict two-dimensional mandibular shape in humans using cephalometric planes and landmarks. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective computerised analysis of 100 lateral cephalometric radiographs taken at Kingston Hospital Orthodontic Department was carried out. RESULTS: Results showed that the Euclidean straight-line mean difference between the estimated position of gonion and traced position of gonion was 7.89 mm and the Euclidean straight-line mean difference between the estimated position of pogonion and the traced position of pogonion was 11.15 mm. The length of the anterior cranial base as measured by sella-nasion was positively correlated with the length of the mandibular body gonion-menton, r = 0.381 and regression analysis showed the length of the anterior cranial base sella-nasion could be predictive of the length of the mandibular body gonion-menton by the equation 22.65 + 0.5426x, where x = length of the anterior cranial base (SN). There was a significant association with convex shaped palates and oblique shaped mandibles, p = 0.0004. CONCLUSIONS: The method described in this study can be used to help estimate the position of cephalometric points gonion and pogonion and thereby sagittal mandibular length. This method is more accurate in skeletal class I cases and therefore has potential applications in craniofacial anthropology and the 'missing mandible' problem in forensic and archaeological reconstruction.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Cephalometric analysis; Forensic anthropology; Mandible; Orthognathic surgery; Shape
Subjects: G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GN Anthropology
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA1001 Forensic Medicine. Medical jurisprudence. Legal medicine
Divisions: Art & Design
Publisher: Springer
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 28 Jan 2021 12:01
Last Modified: 28 Jan 2021 12:02
DOI or Identification number: 10.1186/s40902-020-00282-3
URI: https://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/14341

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