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Performance and image enhancing drug interventions aimed at increasing knowledge among healthcare professionals (HCP): Reflections on the implementation of the Dopinglinkki e-module in the HCP workforce in Europe and Australia

Atkinson, AM, Van De Ven, K, Cunningham, M, de Zeeuw, T, Hibbert, E, Forlini, C, Barkoukis, V and Sumnall, H (2021) Performance and image enhancing drug interventions aimed at increasing knowledge among healthcare professionals (HCP): Reflections on the implementation of the Dopinglinkki e-module in the HCP workforce in Europe and Australia. International Journal of Drug Policy. ISSN 0955-3959

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Performance and image enhancing drug interventions aimed at increasing knowledge among healthcare professionals HCP reflections on the implementation of the Dopinglinkki e-module in the HCP.pdf - Accepted Version
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Abstract

Background: Healthcare professionals (HCPs) provide an important point of contact through which people who use performance and image enhancing drugs (PIEDs) could access reliable information, advice, and interventions on a range of PIEDs, their use and related harms. However, HCPs often report difficulties engaging and building rapport with people who use PIEDs, and research suggests that they often lack specialist knowledge on these substances. Providing credible evidence-based resources to support HCPs is thus important. However, educational materials in this area are generally absent and the ones that exist have not been assessed for their utility in the HCP workforce. This paper examines the acceptability and usability of a PIED e-learning module (the Dopinglinkki e-module) targeted at HCPs in three EU Member States and Australia.
Methods: A standardised two stage, mixed methodology was implemented. Stage 1 involved HCPs completing the e-module and completing an online survey (N = 77). Stage 2 involved conducting individual structured interviews with a subset of survey respondents (N = 37). Normalisation Process Theory and the Theoretical Framework of Acceptability were used as conceptual lenses.
Findings: The e-module provided information that was perceived as useful for HCPs’ current and future practice. However, several individual, organisational and societal level barriers were reported as preventing the e-module becoming an accepted and normalised aspect of the HCP workforce, including the need for up to date evidence, the time-consuming nature of completing the e-module, lack of organisational support, the use of over-complex language, and the module's potential to reinforce the stigmatisation of PIEDs.
Conclusion: Providing credible evidence-based resources to support HCPs’ knowledge development is important. Evidence-based and theory informed interventions are needed to equip HCPs with knowledge that can aid culturally sensitive interactions and effective engagement with people who use PIEDs. Reflecting on our study findings, it is important that the development of interventions should include the voices of both HCP and those using PIEDs, and that careful consideration is given to the various factors that may act as a barrier to effective implementation.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 11 Medical and Health Sciences, 16 Studies in Human Society, 17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Subjects: R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
Divisions: Public Health Institute
Publisher: Elsevier
Date Deposited: 04 Feb 2021 13:24
Last Modified: 04 Feb 2021 13:30
DOI or Identification number: 10.1016/j.drugpo.2021.103141
URI: https://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/14402

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