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Black Lives and Bodywork Matters: A Post- Colonial Critique of Gender and Embodiment in Nigeria

Akobo, LA, Otaye-Ebede, L and Metcalfe, B Black Lives and Bodywork Matters: A Post- Colonial Critique of Gender and Embodiment in Nigeria. Gender, Work and Organization. ISSN 0968-6673 (Accepted)

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Abstract

Drawing on the theories of ‘womanism’ and ‘African feminism’, this paper explores the concept of embodiment within an African context. More specifically, we focus on exploring the lived experiences of Nigerian women in male-dominated organisations (sector) to provide an in-depth understanding of the dynamics of how the Nigerian society marginalises qualities and aspects of embodiment and disembodiment of women. Based on 39 interviews, our findings reveal that cultural and social practices significantly influence the concept of gendered embodiment in the Nigerian context. We further highlight the spatialised dynamic of the religious, ethical, and classed identity formations, and the multiplicities of violence experienced on African women’s bodies every day. Using a feminist standpoint as a lens, we highlight the practice and relevance of social constructivism in understanding the concept of spatialised embodiment in a Nigerian context. We emphasise the complexity and diversity in African feminisms as we highlight the multiplicities of difference in understanding African experiences. Additionally, we emphasise that men are part of the social construct, and hence cannot be left out of the story, given that their influence and perceptions provide further insight into the concept of gendered embodiment and existing marginalisation of and discrimination against women.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1503 Business and Management, 1608 Sociology, 1699 Other Studies in Human Society
Subjects: H Social Sciences > HN Social history and conditions. Social problems. Social reform
H Social Sciences > HQ The family. Marriage. Woman
Divisions: Business & Management (new Sep 19)
Publisher: Wiley
Date Deposited: 09 Feb 2021 12:42
Last Modified: 09 Feb 2021 12:45
DOI or Identification number: 10.1111/gwao.12638
URI: https://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/14424

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