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Effects of a school-based sport intervention on academic achievement, psychosocial functioning and motor performance: A multi-country cluster randomised controlled trial

Pinto-Escalona, T, Gobbi, E, Valenzuela, P, Bennett, SJ, Aschieri, P, Martin-Loeches, M, Paoli, A and Martinez-de-Quel, O Effects of a school-based sport intervention on academic achievement, psychosocial functioning and motor performance: A multi-country cluster randomised controlled trial. Journal of Sport and Health Science. ISSN 2095-2546 (Accepted)

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Abstract

Purpose: To examine the effects of a school-based karate intervention on academic achievement, psychosocial functioning and physical fitness in children aged 7-8 years.
Methods: Twenty schools of five different European countries (two second grade classrooms per school) participated in the present cluster randomised controlled trial (Sport at School trial). Participants were assigned to either a control group, which continued with their habitual physical education lessons, or to an intervention group, which replaced these lessons by a one-year karate intervention (Karate Mind and Movement program). Outcomes included academic performance (average grade), psychosocial functioning (Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire for parents), and different markers of physical fitness (cardiorespiratory fitness, balance and flexibility).
Results: Seven hundred and twenty-one children (344 girls and 377 boys, 7.4±0.5 years) completed the study, of which 333 and 388 were assigned to the control and intervention group, respectively. The intervention provided small but significant benefits compared to the control group for academic achievement (d=0.16; p=0.003), conduct problems (d=-0.28; p=0.003), cardiorespiratory fitness (d=0.36; p0.05).
Conclusions: A one-year school-based karate intervention was effective for the improvement of academic achievement, conduct problems, and physical fitness in primary school children, which supports the inclusion of karate during physical education lessons.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1106 Human Movement and Sports Sciences
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
L Education > L Education (General)
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation Leisure > GV561 Sports
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: Elsevier
Date Deposited: 11 May 2021 09:34
Last Modified: 04 Sep 2021 05:29
URI: https://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/14976

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