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Important gender differences in psychosomatic and school-related complaints in relation to adolescent weight status.

Brooks, SJ, Feldman, I, Schiöth, HB and Titova, OE (2021) Important gender differences in psychosomatic and school-related complaints in relation to adolescent weight status. Scientific Reports, 11 (1). ISSN 2045-2322

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Open Access URL: https://www.nature.com/articles/s41598-021-93761-0 (Published version)

Abstract

Underweight or overweight in adolescence is linked to several adverse health outcomes. Less evidence exists about the association between weight status and school-related psychosocial characteristics in high income countries. We sought to investigate the relationship between weight status and psychosomatic and school-related complaints with a focus on gender differences. The study is a cohort of 18,462 adolescents (12-19 years; 51% girls) conducted in Sweden. The associations between weight status and psychosomatic and school-related complaints were estimated by binary logistic regression adjusted for several potential confounders. After correction for multiple testing, being underweight or overweight/obese was adversely associated with several psychosomatic and school-related complaints with significant differences between boys and girls. Specifically, underweight boys had higher odds to have psychosomatic complaints than normal-weight boys, while no such associations were observed among underweight girls. Overweight/obese (vs. normal-weight) boys had higher odds to complain about headache, pain in the back/hips, and feeling low. Overweight/obese (vs. normal-weight) girls were more likely to complain about feeling low, anxious/worried and having difficulty in falling asleep (P ≤ 0.01). In relation to school-related complaints (e.g., being bullied at school and academic failure), greater associations were observed for overweight/obese girls and boys than for underweight adolescents compared with normal-weight peers.

Item Type: Article
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RA Public aspects of medicine > RA0421 Public health. Hygiene. Preventive Medicine
R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics > RJ101 Child Health. Child health services
Divisions: Psychology (new Sep 2019)
Publisher: Nature Publishing Group
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 19 Jul 2021 09:21
Last Modified: 19 Jul 2021 09:30
DOI or Identification number: 10.1038/s41598-021-93761-0
URI: https://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/15299

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