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Sex-related differences in the association of fundamental movement skills and health and behavioral outcomes in children

Hill, P, McNarry, M, Lester, L, Foweather, L, Boddy, LM, Fairclough, S and Mackintosh, K Sex-related differences in the association of fundamental movement skills and health and behavioral outcomes in children. Journal of Motor Learning and Development. ISSN 2325-3193 (Accepted)

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Abstract

This study aimed to assess whether sex moderates the association of fundamental movement skills (FMS) and health and behavioral outcomes. In 170 children (10.6 ± 0.3 years; 98 girls), path-analysis was used to assess the associations of FMS (Get Skilled, Get Active) with perceived sports competence (Children and Youth - Physical Self-Perception Profile), time spent in vigorous-intensity physical activity (VPA), sedentary time and body mass index (BMI) z-score. For boys, object control skill competence had a direct association with perceived sports competence (β = 0.39; 95% CI: 0.21 to 0.57) and an indirect association with sedentary time, through perceived sports competence (β = -0.19; 95% CI: -0.09 to -0.32). No significant association was observed between FMS and perceived sports competence for girls, although locomotor skills were found to predict VPA (β = 0.18; 95% CI: 0.08 to 0.27). Perceived sports competence was associated with sedentary time, with this stronger for boys (β = -0.48; 95% CI: -0.64 to -0.31), than girls (β = -0.29; 95% CI: -0.39 to -0.19). The study supports a holistic approach to health-related interventions and highlights a key association of perceived sports competence and the time children spend sedentary.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Accepted author manuscript version reprinted, by permission, from Journal of Motor Learning and Development, 2021 (ahead of print). © Human Kinetics, Inc.
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
R Medicine > RJ Pediatrics > RJ101 Child Health. Child health services
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: Human Kinetics
Date Deposited: 14 Sep 2021 08:46
Last Modified: 14 Sep 2021 08:46
URI: https://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/15483

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