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The interaction of Helicobacter pylori with cancer immunomodulatory stromal cells: new insight into gastric cancer pathogenesis

Navashenaq, JG, Shabgah, AG, Banach, M, Jamialahmadi, T, Penson, PE, Johnston, TP and Sahebkar, A (2021) The interaction of Helicobacter pylori with cancer immunomodulatory stromal cells: new insight into gastric cancer pathogenesis. Seminars in Cancer Biology. ISSN 1044-579X

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Abstract

Gastric cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer-linked deaths in the world. Gastric tumor cells have biological characteristics such as rapid proliferation, high invasiveness, and drug resistance, which result in recurrence and poor survival. Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been proposed as a first‐class carcinogen for gastric cancer according to the 1994 world health organization (WHO) classification. One of the important mechanisms by which H. pylori affects the gastric environment and promotes carcinogenesis is triggering inflammation. H. pylori induces an inflammatory response and a plethora of different signal transduction processes, leading to gastric mucosal disturbance, chronic gastritis, and a multi-step complex pathway that initiates carcinogenesis. It seems undeniable that the interaction between various cell types, including immune cells, gastric epithelium, glands, and stem cells, is vital for the progression and development of carcinogenesis concerning H. pylori. The interactions of H. pylori with surrounding cells play a key role in cancer progression. In this review, we discuss the interplay between H. pylori and tumor-supportive cells, including mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs), tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs), and myeloid derived-suppressor cells (MDSCs) in gastric cancer. It is hoped that clarifying the specific mechanisms for ‘cross-talk’ between H. pylori and these cells will provide promising strategies for developing new treatments.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1112 Oncology and Carcinogenesis
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0254 Neoplasms. Tumors. Oncology (including Cancer)
R Medicine > RM Therapeutics. Pharmacology
Divisions: Pharmacy & Biomolecular Sciences
Publisher: Elsevier
Date Deposited: 01 Oct 2021 10:07
Last Modified: 01 Oct 2021 10:07
DOI or Identification number: 10.1016/j.semcancer.2021.09.014
URI: https://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/15588

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