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Clinical exercise provision in the UK: comparison of staff job titles, roles and qualifications across five specialised exercise services

Crozier, A, Watson, PM, Graves, LEF, George, KP, Naylor, L, Green, DJ, Rosenberg, M and Jones, H Clinical exercise provision in the UK: comparison of staff job titles, roles and qualifications across five specialised exercise services. BMJ Open Sport and Exercise Medicine. ISSN 2055-7647 (Accepted)

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Abstract

Objectives: In the UK, the NHS long-term plan advocates exercise as a key component of clinical services, but there is no clearly defined workforce to deliver the plan. We aimed to provide an overview of current UK clinical exercise services, focusing on exercise staff job titles, roles, and qualifications across cardiovascular, respiratory, stroke, falls, and cancer services.
Methods: Clinical exercise services were identified electronically between May 2020 and September 2020 using publicly available information from clinical commissioning groups (CCG), national health boards and published audit data. Data relating to staff job titles, roles, qualifications and exercise delivery were collected via electronic records and telephone/e-mail contact with service providers.
Results: Data were obtained for 731 of 890 eligible clinical services (216 cardiac, 162 respiratory, 129 stroke, 117 falls, 107 cancer). Cardiac rehabilitation services provided both clinical (phase III) and community (phase IV) exercise interventions delivered by physiotherapists, exercise physiologists (exercise specific BSc/MSc) and exercise instructors (vocationally qualified with or without BSc/MSc). Respiratory, stroke and falls services provided a clinical exercise intervention only, mostly delivered by physiotherapists and occupational therapists. Cancer services provided a community exercise service only, delivered by vocationally qualified exercise instructors. Job titles of “exercise physiologists” (n=115) bore little alignment to their qualifications, with a large heterogeneity across services.
Conclusion: In the UK, clinical exercise services job titles, roles and qualifications were inconsistent. Regulation of exercise job titles and roles is required to remove the current disparities in this area.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1106 Human Movement and Sports Sciences
Subjects: R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: BMJ Publishing Group
Date Deposited: 05 Jan 2022 12:43
Last Modified: 05 Jan 2022 12:45
URI: https://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/15974

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