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Managing uncertainty: Physicians’ decision-making for stroke prevention for patients with atrial fibrillation and intracerebral haemorrhage.

Ivany, E, Lotto, RR, Lip, GYH and Lane, D (2022) Managing uncertainty: Physicians’ decision-making for stroke prevention for patients with atrial fibrillation and intracerebral haemorrhage. Thrombosis and Haemostasis. ISSN 0340-6245

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Managing uncertainty Physicians’ decision-making for stroke prevention for patients with atrial fibrillation and intracerebral haemorrhage..pdf - Accepted Version
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Abstract

Background Stroke prevention in patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) post-intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH) is an area of clinical equipoise. Little is known about the tools and processes that physicians use to make decisions regarding anticoagulation in this high-risk patient population. Objective To explore physicians’ decision-making process regarding stroke prevention in patients with AF and a recent history of ICH. Method Qualitative study, utilising semi-structured interviews and analysed using Framework analysis. Results Twenty physicians from five European countries (Austria, France, Germany, Spain, United Kingdom) participated. The over-arching theme ‘Managing uncertainty’, addressed the process of making high-risk clinical decisions in the context of little available robust clinical evidence for best practice. Three sub-themes were identified under the umbrella theme: (1) ‘Computing the Risks’, captured the challenge of balancing the risks of ischaemic stroke with the risk of recurrent ICH in a complex patient population; (2) ‘Patient Factors’ highlighted the influence that patients’ beliefs and previous experience of stroke had on physicians’ decisions; and (3) ‘Making a Decision’ explored the process of reaching a final decision regarding initiation of OAC therapy or not. Conclusion Physicians described the process of deciding on stroke prevention in patients with AF post-ICH as ‘challenging’ due to considerable ‘clinical equipoise’. Key factors that affected decision-making was patient comorbidities, functional status, and patient willingness to engage with oral anticoagulation therapy. Shared decision-making was believed to be beneficial, but physicians believed that the ultimate responsibility to decide on stroke prevention lay with the clinician.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: Embargo requested: Not known
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1102 Cardiorespiratory Medicine and Haematology, 1103 Clinical Sciences
Subjects: R Medicine > R Medicine (General)
R Medicine > RT Nursing
Divisions: Nursing & Allied Health
Publisher: Georg Thieme Verlag KG
Date Deposited: 10 Mar 2022 12:36
Last Modified: 10 Mar 2022 12:45
DOI or Identification number: 10.1055/a-1789-4824
URI: https://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/16477

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