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13C-glucose-fructose labelling reveals comparable exogenous CHO oxidation during exercise when consuming 120 g/h in fluid, gel, jelly chew or co-ingestion

Hearris, MA, Pugh, JN, Langan-Evans, C, Mann, SJ, Burke, L, Stellingwerff, T, Gonzalez, JT and Morton, JP 13C-glucose-fructose labelling reveals comparable exogenous CHO oxidation during exercise when consuming 120 g/h in fluid, gel, jelly chew or co-ingestion. Journal of applied physiology. ISSN 8750-7587 (Accepted)

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Abstract

We examined the effects of carbohydrate (CHO) delivery form on exogenous CHO oxidation, gastrointestinal discomfort, and exercise capacity. In a randomised repeated measures design (after 24 h of high CHO intake (8 g·kg-1) and pre-exercise meal (2 g·kg-1)), nine trained males ingested 120 g CHO·h-1 from fluid (DRINK), semi-solid gel (GEL), solid jelly chew (CHEW), or a co-ingestion approach (MIX). Participants cycled for 180 min at 95% lactate threshold followed by an exercise capacity test (150% lactate threshold). Peak rates of exogenous CHO oxidation (DRINK, 1.56 ± 0.16; GEL, 1.58 ± 0.13; CHEW, 1.59 ± 0.08; MIX, 1.66 ± 0.02 g·min-1) and oxidation efficiency (DRINK, 72 ± 8; GEL, 72 ± 5; CHEW, 75 ± 5; MIX, 75 ± 6%) were not different between trials (all P > 0.05). Despite ingesting 120 g·h-1, participants reported minimal symptoms of gastrointestinal distress across all trials. Exercise capacity was also not significantly different (all P < 0.05) between conditions (DRINK, 446 ± 350; GEL, 529 ± 396; CHEW, 596 ± 416; MIX, 469 ± 395 sec). Data represent the first time that rates of exogenous CHO oxidation (via stable isotope methodology) have been simultaneously assessed using feeding strategies (i.e., pre-exercise CHO feeding and the different forms and combinations of CHO during exercise) commonly adopted by elite endurance athletes. We conclude 120 g·h-1 CHO (in a 1:0.8 ratio of maltodextrin or glucose:fructose) is a practically tolerable strategy to promote high CHO availability and oxidation during exercise.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: Stable isotopes; fructose; maltodextrin; metabolism; Physiology; 06 Biological Sciences; 11 Medical and Health Sciences
Subjects: T Technology > TX Home economics > TX341 Nutrition. Foods and food supply
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC1200 Sports Medicine
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: American Physiological Society
SWORD Depositor: A Symplectic
Date Deposited: 26 Apr 2022 09:51
Last Modified: 26 Apr 2022 09:51
DOI or Identification number: 10.1152/japplphysiol.00091.2022
URI: https://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/16713

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