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Self-Regulation and Power: How Self-Regulatory Failures Can Enhance Social Power

McIntyre, JC, von Hippel, W and Barlow, FK (2016) Self-Regulation and Power: How Self-Regulatory Failures Can Enhance Social Power. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 10 (1). ISSN 1751-9004

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Abstract

© 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. Low self-control is often associated with poor life outcomes. Here, we propose that self-control failures may also provide social benefits by signaling and maintaining power. We identify several pathways by which reduced self-control can assist in ascending social hierarchies. First, the self-enhancing tendencies adopted by people with low self-control may contribute to making positive first impressions and advertising power to new acquaintances. The direct and disinhibited communication styles that stem from self-control failures may also enhance power and lubricate difficult social interactions. Disinhibited aggression can help people maintain and acquire material resources and establish dominance over rivals. Finally, the parallels between the behavior of people with low self-control and people with power (e.g., self-enhancement, disinhibition, approach-orientation, aggression) suggest that people with impaired self-control will be perceived as more powerful than people with intact self-control. Evidence for these propositions and directions for future research are discussed.

Item Type: Article
Additional Information: This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: McIntyre, J. C., von Hippel, W., and Barlow, F. K. (2016) Self‐Regulation and Power: How Self‐Regulatory Failures Can Enhance Social Power. Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 10: 41–49, which has been published in final form at http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/spc3.12228]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1701 Psychology, 1702 Cognitive Science
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions: Natural Sciences and Psychology
Publisher: Wiley
Date Deposited: 26 Jul 2018 13:37
Last Modified: 27 Jul 2018 12:10
DOI or Identification number: 10.1111/spc3.12228
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/9030

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