Facial reconstruction

Search LJMU Research Online

Browse Repository | Browse E-Theses

Application of feedback principles to marking proformas increases student efficacy, perceived utility of feedback, and likelihood of use

Thomas, LB and Oliver, EJ Application of feedback principles to marking proformas increases student efficacy, perceived utility of feedback, and likelihood of use. Sport and Exercise Psychology Review. ISSN 1745-4980 (Accepted)

[img] Text
Thomas and Oliver (2017).pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to Repository staff only

Download (165kB)

Abstract

Pedagogical and psychological literature identifies numerous factors contributing to feedback effectiveness, including type, frequency, and specificity (e.g., Gibbs & Simpson, 2004). Despite this wealth of research, feedback practice at universities is often reported as problematic or poor by students (NSS; Williams & Kane, 2008; 2009) despite lecturers perceiving their feedback as useful (Carless, 2006; Maclellan, 2001). The present research employed a quantitative counterbalanced experimental design to compare the perceived utility of a pedagogically informed feedback proforma, designed to provide detailed, timely, and constructive feedback, to standard practice. Results suggest that the presentation of feedback is important to students; more functional and comprehensible feedback increases the likelihood of students using the feedback provided, and can reduce likely marking time per script without compromising perceived feedback quality. Further to this, post-submission feedback proformas increase students’ confidence in their ability to complete the assignment when provided alongside the assignment title. In summary, the research supports the application of principles of feedback in the provision of summative feedback to enhance students’ likelihood of use, perceived value of the feedback received, and confidence.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1701 Psychology, 1702 Cognitive Science, 1117 Public Health And Health Services
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation Leisure > GV561 Sports
Divisions: Sport & Exercise Sciences
Publisher: British Psychological Society
Date Deposited: 09 Jan 2019 10:13
Last Modified: 09 Jan 2019 10:22
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/9905

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item