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Dissociable pathways for moving and static face perceptionbegin in early visual cortex: evidence from an acquired prosopagnosic

Sliwinska, M, Bearpark, C, Corkhill, J, McPhillips, A and Pitcher, D (2020) Dissociable pathways for moving and static face perceptionbegin in early visual cortex: evidence from an acquired prosopagnosic. Cortex. ISSN 1973-8102

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Abstract

To investigate the functional connections between the core components of the face processing network we tested Herschel, an acquired prosopagnosic patient with a right ventral occipitotemporal lesion. In Experiment 1, Herschel, and control participants, were scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while viewing videos of moving faces, or static images taken from the videos. In Experiment 2, participants viewed videos of actors making facial expressions, or static images taken from the videos. In Experiment 3, participants viewed videos of moving faces presented in the left or right visual field. Results showed the neural response in Herschel’s right occipital face area (OFA) was impaired for moving and static faces (Experiment 1), moving expressions (Experiment 2) and moving faces in the left visual field (Experiment 3). The response in Herschel’s right fusiform face area (FFA) to moving and static faces was impaired in Experiment 1 only, in Experiments 2 and 3 Herschel’s FFA response was not significantly different from controls. By contrast, the response in Herschel’s right posterior superior temporal sulcus (rpSTS) to moving and static faces and expressions (Experiments 1 and 2) and the visual field response (Experiment 3) was not significantly different from control participants. Our results demonstrate there are cortico-cortical inputs to the pSTS from early visual cortex that are independent of the OFA, a conclusion inconsistent with established models of face processing.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1109 Neurosciences, 1701 Psychology, 1702 Cognitive Sciences
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
R Medicine > RC Internal medicine > RC0321 Neuroscience. Biological psychiatry. Neuropsychiatry
Divisions: Psychology (new Sep 2019)
Publisher: Elsevier
Date Deposited: 13 Jul 2020 14:22
Last Modified: 13 Jul 2020 14:30
DOI or Identification number: 10.1016/j.cortex.2020.03.033
URI: https://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/13295

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