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Effectiveness of a 16 week gymnastics curriculum at developing movement competence in children.

Rudd, JR and Barnett, LM and Farrow, D and Berry, J and Borkoles, E and Polman, R (2016) Effectiveness of a 16 week gymnastics curriculum at developing movement competence in children. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. ISSN 1878-1861

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Abstract

OBJECTIVES: Internationally, children's movement competence levels are low. This study's aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 16 week gymnastics curriculum on stability, locomotive and object control skills and general body coordination. It was hypothesised that the gymnastics intervention group would demonstrate significant improvements beyond a PE comparison group. DESIGN: This study used a non-randomised control design. The intervention and comparison groups were drawn from three primary schools. The study followed the transparent reporting of evaluations with nonrandomized designs (TREND) statement for reporting. METHODS: A total of 333 children (51% girls, 41% intervention) with a mean age of 8.1 years (SD=1.1) participated. Intervention children (16 weeks×2h of gymnastics) were compared to children who received (16×2h) standard PE curriculum. Children's movement competence was assessed using the Test of Gross Motor Development-2, Stability Skills Assessment and the Körper-Koordinationstest für Kinder. Multilevel linear mixed models, accounting for variation at the class level and adjusted for age and sex, were used to assess intervention relative to comparison differences in all aspects of movement competence. RESULTS: Stability and object control skills showed a significant (p<0.05) intervention×time interaction effect. No difference was found in locomotor skills or general coordination. CONCLUSIONS: Gymnastics is effective at developing stability skills and object control skills without hindering the development of locomotor skills or general coordination. Accelerated learning of stability skills may support the development of more complex movement skills.

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1106 Human Movement And Sports Science, 1117 Public Health And Health Services
Subjects: L Education > LB Theory and practice of education
L Education > LB Theory and practice of education > LB1501 Primary Education
G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GV Recreation Leisure > GV561 Sports
Divisions: School of Sport Studies, Leisure and Nutrition
Publisher: Elsevier
Related URLs:
Date Deposited: 26 Jan 2017 10:06
Last Modified: 07 Sep 2017 13:21
DOI or Identification number: 10.1016/j.jsams.2016.06.013
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/5366

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