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An examination of the self-referent executive processing model of test anxiety: control, emotional regulation, self-handicapping, and examination performance

Putwain, DW (2018) An examination of the self-referent executive processing model of test anxiety: control, emotional regulation, self-handicapping, and examination performance. European Journal of Psychology of Education. ISSN 0256-2928

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Abstract

According to the self-referent executive processing (S-REF) model, test anxiety develops from interactions between three systems: executive self-regulation processes, self-beliefs, and maladaptive situational interactions. Studies have tended to examine one system at a time, often in conjunction with how test anxiety relates to achievement outcomes. The aim of this study was to enable a more thorough test of the S-REF model by examining one key construct from each of these systems simultaneously. These were control (a self-belief construct), emotional regulation through suppression and reappraisal (an executive process), and self-handicapping (a maladaptive situational interaction). Relations were examined from control, emotional regulation, and self-handicapping to cognitive test anxiety (worry), and subsequent examination performance on a high-stakes test. Data were collected from 273 participants in their final year of secondary education. A structural equation model showed that higher control was indirectly related to better examination performance through lower worry, higher reappraisal was indirectly related to worse examination performance through higher worry, and higher self-handicapping was related to worse examination performance through lower control and higher worry. These findings suggest that increasing control and reducing self-handicapping would be key foci for test anxiety interventions to incorporate. © 2018 The Author(s)

Item Type: Article
Uncontrolled Keywords: 1303 Specialist Studies In Education, 1701 Psychology
Subjects: B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
L Education > LB Theory and practice of education > LB1603 Secondary Education. High schools
Divisions: School of Education
Publisher: Springer Verlag
Date Deposited: 11 Jul 2018 08:37
Last Modified: 12 Oct 2018 12:42
DOI or Identification number: 10.1007/s10212-018-0383-z
URI: http://researchonline.ljmu.ac.uk/id/eprint/8939

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